"Not all those who wander are lost." – J.R.R. Tolkien

Posts tagged “singletrack

Ride Report: Gull Lake Loop – June Lake, CA

If you are new to mountain biking, or want to take a short ride while spending the day in the beautiful town of June Lakes, this is a great ride for anyone.  It’s mostly fantastic singletrack, offering up nice views of Gull Lake and the June Mountain Ski Area, and even slithers its way through a small aspen grove. This loop can be done in both directions, but the trailhead near Gull Lake Park is easier to find for your first time – so counter-clockwise is how we describe it here.  It’s mostly flat, with just a couple short/steep efforts.  If you’re looking for more riding nearby,  check out the Yost Trail.  While in town, don’t forget to grab a beer at June Lake Brewing and a kailua pig burrito from Ohanas – just a couple blocks from Gull Lake.

  • Ride Type:  Loop (counter-clockwise as we describe it, but it can be ridden both ways)
  • Difficulty: Non-Technical, Easy with Minimal Climbing
  • Time of Year: Summer and Fall (sometimes late Winter or Spring – depending on snow pack)
  • Terrain/Conditions: Mostly smooth singletrack with a little doubletrack and a short stretch of pavement through the campground.
  • Access: From Mammoth, take Highway 395 north for 20 miles to the southern turnoff for the June Lake Loop (Hwy 158).  Drive for a little over 2 miles, through town.  You’ll see signs for Gull Lake leading you down to the right.  Once you reach Gull Lake Park on Granite Avenue, park by the tennis courts and the playground.  The trailhead / ride start is directly across the street where you see the trail going steeply up the hillside.
  • Length: 1.9 miles
  • Approx. Time: 1/2 hour
  • Lowest Elevation: 7,623′
  • Highest Elevation: 7,711′
  • Total Elevation Gain: 103′
  • Bike Recommendation:  This can be ridden with pretty much any off-road bike.
  • GPX File: Available by contacting us

Turn by Turn (in miles):

0.0 – Start up the steep climb.  Don’t be discouraged.  It looks like a long hard climb, but after 20 yards you make a left turn and it flattens out.
0.5 – Continue straight, merging with the doubletrack trail, and heading up a short climb.
0.7 – Go left on the singletrack
1.0 – Reach an intersection with a fire road. Continue straight (you must curve to the right for 10 feet).  After a short stretch, you’ll reach a blockade that only allows bikes and hikers.  Descend here, and then go right at the T.
1.2 – Veer left at trail split, go over the bridge and pop out on pavement.  Continue on the road to the left, taking you through the campground.
1.5 – The pavement turns to dirt and you pass a bunch of cabins. Continue straight on the dirt road.
1.7 – The wide dirt road narrows to singletrack.
1.8 – Go left, staying on singletrack.  After a short, windy section, you emerge in the Gull Lake Marina parking lot.  Continue riding straight out of the parking lot.  It turns into Granite Ave.
1.9 – Turn left, staying on Granite Ave.  The park is on your left, and the loop is complete.  Do it again!!

Gull Lake Loop - Map

Gull Lake Loop – Map

Gull Lake Loop - Elevation Profile

Gull Lake Loop – Elevation Profile

A gorgeous view of Gull Lake and the surrounding mountains.

A gorgeous view of Gull Lake and the surrounding mountains.

Some fast flowy singletrack through the meadow.

Some fast flowy singletrack through the meadow.

A fun, twisty section through a small aspen grove.

A fun, twisty section through a small aspen grove.

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Ride Report: Inyo Craters Singletrack – Mammoth Lakes, CA

Inyo Craters Singletrack is a sweet little section of trail that doesn’t get ridden as much as it should.  After a great flowy section, you reach a parking area where it connects with an old jeep road that takes you up to the Inyo Craters Lookout.  Here you must park your bike, as it’s illegal to ride bikes on the trails around the craters.  There are some picnic tables, interpretive signs, and it’s a nice place to hike around and eat a snack before heading back down.   This ride is short on it’s own, but splendid when combined with the Inyo Craters Loop or Inyo Craters Fat Double Lollipoop.

*Note: There are some hiking only trails up to the Inyo Craters – please do not ride your bike on those.  Stay on the route listed here.

  • Ride Type: Out and Back as described here
  • Difficulty: Easy with a couple short, steep climbs
  • Time of Year: Late Spring (once snow melts off), Summer and Fall
  • Terrain/Conditions: Singletrack and primitive jeep road
  • Access: From Mammoth, drive up Highway 203 towards Main Lodge of Mammoth Mountain Ski Area. Make a right on Mammoth Scenic Loop. At 2.75 miles, turn left on 3S30 at the “Inyo Craters” sign. Go 0.3 miles. The road will split and there’s a dirt parking area on the right. The ride starts here. The singletrack is to the right, and there’s a small sign with no trail name (see photo).
  • Length: 2.64 miles (1.32 miles each way)
  • Approx. Time: 20 – 30 minutes ride time
  • Lowest Elevation: 8,058′
  • Highest Elevation: 8,230′
  • Total Elevation Gain: 224′
  • Bike Recommendation: Run what you brung.  Any off-road bike will do.
  • GPX File: Available by contacting us

Turn By Turn (in miles):

0.0 – start at the trailhead sign (see photo), going up the Inyo Craters Singletrack
.72 – cross the road and start grunting up the short, steep, soft climb- don’t worry it levels off quickly.
.88 – arrive in the main Inyo Craters parking area. turn left and go past the bathrooms.
.92 – you’ll pass a hiking trail and kiosk to the right.  continue straight, don’t take the hiking trail.
.95 – reach two green poles blocking an old jeep road on the right (see photo).  enter the trail here and start climbing.
1.32 – arrive at the top.  if you want to explore here, park your bike and hike around.  when you’re done, retrace your steps back to the car.
2.64 – end of ride.

Inyo Craters Singletrack Map

Inyo Craters Singletrack Map

Inyo Craters Singletrack - Elevation Profile

Inyo Craters Singletrack – Elevation Profile

The trailhead at both ends is very incognito, with no labelled sign.  This is the trailhead at the start of the singletrack.

The trailhead at both ends is very incognito, with no labelled sign. This is the trailhead at the start of the singletrack.

A fun slice of singletrack

A fun slice of singletrack

You made it to the top.  No riding bikes past here.  Go walk around and check it out.

You made it to the top. No riding bikes past here. Go walk around and check it out.

Interpretive sign near the craters

Interpretive sign near the craters

A look down into the crater.  Gorgeous color!

A look down into the crater. Gorgeous color!

Another piece of excellent singletrack heading back down towards the car

Another piece of excellent singletrack heading back down towards the car

 


Ride Report: Inyo Craters Loop – Mammoth Lakes, CA

The Inyo Craters Loop is an old school Mammoth ride.  It was one of the earliest USFS signed bike routes. Other than the Inyo Craters Singletrack (which we include with our version of the loop), the terrain is pretty much jeep roads. There is moderate climbing, with some sweet views and a good tour of the area. This is a relaxing ride that’s definitely worth doing for some peaceful exercise.  If you want a little more ride time / exertion, try the Inyo Craters Fat Double Lollipoop.

This ride goes around the two Inyo Craters, which were formed from a volcanic explosion 1,500 years ago. Pretty cool.

Soon after finishing the singletrack section, you ride out of the forest and a huge pumice flat opens up in front of you. 360 degree wicked views await, including San Joaquin Ridge and White Wing Mountain. Next you enter a Jeffrey Pine Forest and cross Deadman Creek before paralleling the creek and curving around and starting back towards the craters. After a peaceful ride through the forest, you arrive at the main parking lot. Lucky for you, you get to ride the singletrack back the way you came. Nice!

**NOTE FOR WINTER / FAT BIKE RIDING – This route is usually packed by snowmobiles and trucks before grooming starts for the season.  Other than the singletrack section (which sees no Winter use) the rest is usually fun on a fat bike with low tire pressure.  Remember, once grooming starts, all groomed trails are OFF LIMITS to bikes.  Click here for the grooming report to see if it’s currently legal to ride.  Questions?  Contact us.

  • Ride Type: Loop (clockwise as described) with Singletrack out and back section
  • Difficulty: Non-Technical, Moderately Strenuous
  • Time of Year: Summer and Fall (possible late spring depending on snow pack), and early Winter (on fat bike before grooming begins).
  • Terrain/Conditions: Singletrack first and last mile, otherwise double-track and fire road with some soft & sandy sections.
  • Access: From Mammoth, drive up Highway 203 towards Main Lodge of Mammoth Mountain Ski Area. Make a right on Mammoth Scenic Loop. At 2.75 miles, turn left on 3S30 at the “Inyo Craters” sign. Go 0.3 miles. The road will split and there’s a dirt parking area on the right. The ride starts here. The singletrack is to the right, and there’s a small sign with no trail name (see photo).
  • Length: 11.9 miles
  • Approx. Time: 1.5 -2.5 hours
  • Lowest Elevation: 7,711′
  • Highest Elevation: 8,161′
  • Total Elevation Gain: 636′
  • Bike Recommendation: XC Mountain Bike, Fat Bike
  • GPX File: contact us
  • More info: MammothTrails.org

Turn By Turn:

0.0 start at the trailhead sign (see photo), going up the Inyo Crater Singletrack
.72 cross the road and start grunting up the short, steep, soft climb- don’t worry it levels off quickly.
.9 arrive in the main Inyo Craters parking area. go left past the bathrooms, and head out. you are on 3S30.
1.2 go right on 3S22 at intersection
1.48 stay left
1.96 stay right at Y as you go out into the pumice flats, and the beautiful views open up to you (see photo)
3.0 veer right
3.8 go straight
4.2 cross a dry (usually) creek
4.85 veer right, take bridge over deadman creek, continue right
5.0 continue right at T then stay straight- views to your right, creek below you to right- sweet descent
5.5 continue straight at intersection
6.0 notice upper deadman campground on right, obsidian flat campground on left
6.5 go right on 2S29 – then stay on main rd through forest
8.0 go right
9.4 veer right then stay straight towards inyo craters rd
10.0 left at T
10.4 veer left
10.7 right at T climb back to the main parking area, and head right to the singletrack
11.0 enter the singletrack to the right, and head back down to the staging area
11.9 done!!

Inyo Craters Loop Map

Inyo Craters Loop Map

Inyo Craters Loop - Elevation Profile

Inyo Craters Loop – Elevation Profile

Inyo Craters Singletrack trailhead

Inyo Craters Singletrack trailhead

Pumice Flat area with views to White Wing Mountain

Pumice Flat area with views to White Wing Mountain

Crater Flats during Winter - before grooming, of course :)

Crater Flats during Winter – before grooming, of course 🙂

Taking a break near Deadman Creek

Taking a break near Deadman Creek


Ride Report: Saddlebag Lake Trail near Yosemite, CA

This oft forgotten singletrack trail is not ridden enough.  Most people are unaware that it even exists, much less that it’s open to mountain biking.  It is tucked cleverly between Yosemite National Park and the Hoover Wilderness, butting right next to the Wilderness Boundary in a couple of spots.  It’s only a 45 minute drive from Mammoth. Although the ride is short (only 4 miles), it’s definitely not short on exquisite views!! There’s minimal climbing, but there are some technical sections that will surprise you, and some punchy efforts that will get your heart rate up.  Much of the trail is fairly smooth, but there’s also a fair share of rocks and shale that sneak up on you.  Be ready for it.  We describe this ride as a loop.  Most people do it as a loop.  However, the last section of trail (approx. 1.5 miles) is almost all rock and shale, and not much fun for less skilled riders.  If you’re doing the full loop, full suspension or a fat bike will help.  Most people will have to hike some of the obnoxious sections.  In our opinion, the best part of this ride is the first half.  The best terrain, trail quality, and views are had while riding the the east and north side of the lake, right up until you reach the Forest Service cabin.  Therefore, we’ve written directions for the full loop, but also notated the out and back to the cabin.  Your choice, just wanted to give fair warning.

Also in the area are the Bennettville Ride, Log Cabin Mine Loop, and Moraines and Meadows Ride.  You might want do one or more of those rides to make a great day of riding.  Saddlebag Lake is also a great spot to fish, or just hang out with the family and make a day out of it.

  • Ride Type:  Loop (counter-clockwise is the way we recommend), or out and back to the cabin
  • Difficulty: Moderately technical (some rocks and shale), but pretty easy on the lungs
  • Time of Year: Summer and Fall (sometimes late spring – depending on snow pack)
  • Terrain/Conditions: Almost all singletrack, some smooth, some shale/rock gardens – with gorgeous high alpine scenery and lake views everywhere
  • Access: From the junction of Highway 203 and 395 at Mammoth Lakes, drive north on the 395 for 25 miles.  Exit and go left on Highway 120/ Tioga Pass.  You’ll pass the Mobil Mart on your left.  You might want to stop here later for some great grub and live music depending on time of year you are riding.  Anyhoo, continue driving for 10 miles and turn right at the Saddlebag Lake Sign.  Then drive for another 2.5 miles on a mostly dirt road.  Go to the parking lot at the end of the road and spot the restrooms to the right.  The trail sign is just past the restrooms.
  • Length: 4.1 miles
  • Approx. Time: 45 minutes to 1.5 hours for the loop (shorter for the out and back)
  • Lowest Elevation: 10,055′
  • Highest Elevation: 10,192′
  • Total Elevation Gain: 361′
  • Bike Recommendation:  This can be ridden with pretty much any off-road bike, but full suspension or fat bike is recommended for the western portion of the loop.
  • GPX File: Available by contacting us
  • Other Reference: Hunter’s Saddlebag Lake Trail Blog

Turn by Turn (in miles):

0.0 – Start at the trail sign, heading around the lake to the right (counter-clockwise).  Right off the bat, there are a few sections of rock and shale that will warm you up quickly.
.50 – The trail opens up to smooth flowing singletrack with some great lake views
.75  – Cross a small creek
.85 – Rocky climb.  Once you crest the climb, views of the rest of the lake become apparent.  The trail now strays from the shoreline a bit and meanders through pine trees and stays a little cooler.
2.07 – Arrive at the old cabin on the left

** If you choose to do this ride as an out and back, this is the turn around point.  Simply retrace your steps and go back the way you came. If you’re continuing to complete the loop, keep following the cues below:

2.1 – You reach a Wilderness trail sign to the right.  Do not take this.  Continue straight across the creek bed.
2.25 – You reach another Wilderness trail sign letting you know that you’re about to enter Wilderness.  Do not take it.  Instead a few yards before the sign, there is a singletrack trail to your left.  Take this to continue the loop you are on.
2.35 – There is a small bridge with a couple of logs to your left.  It’s hard to see as it’s surrounded by brush.  Use this bridge to cross the creek.  Don’t miss this turn!! Just after the creek crossing, there are a couple of techy rock gardens and one short climb to navigate.
2.52 – Go left at the junction with another trail.   You’ll now enter the most hateful portion of the ride.  Rocks and shale make for annoying riding all the ay home.
3.69 – Reach the bridge.  Cross the bridge and take the singletrack to your left which will bring you back to the parking lot.
4.1 – Arrive at trail sign and finish ride.

Saddlebag Lake Trail - Map

Saddlebag Lake Trail – Map

Saddlebag Lake Trail - Elevation Profile

Saddlebag Lake Trail – Elevation Profile

Trail sign, and start of the ride

Trail sign, and start of the ride

A sweet section of singletrack going along the east side of the lake

A sweet section of singletrack going along the east side of the lake

View looking back to the south side of the lake

View looking back to the south side of the lake

The old cabin that marks the half way point of the ride

The old cabin that marks the half way point of the ride

The first trail sign you come across marking the route to Lundy Lake.  Do not take this!  No bikes allowed.

The first trail sign you come across marking the route to Lundy Lake. Do not take this! No bikes allowed.

Lots of hikers and equestrians during peak season.  Remember to always yield to other user groups

Lots of hikers and equestrians during peak season. Remember to always yield to other user groups

More great views, more great trail.

More great views, more great trail.

Parked on the bridge

Parked on the bridge.  I forgot to cut my number plate off after the VC race earlier in the week.  Oops.

 


Ride Report: Yost Meadows Trail – June Lake, CA

Yost Meadows Trail is one of the most under-rated and overlooked trails around. It’s super easy to access, with parking right off the June Lake Loop.  The first mile or so is brutal climbing, with no warmup, that usually involves serious granny-gear pounding or hike-a-bike if you’re on a singlespeed (like me).  But the views you get of June Lake and Gull Lake make you forget that you’re wheezing and gasping for dear life. Take a moment to soak it in. The climbing mellows a bit after this point as you spin through alpine meadows and aspen groves.  By this point, you’re probably imagining how much bliss this singletrack will be on the way back down!  Eventually you enter the ski area- and the trail descends a little before crossing under the lift and climbing some more. The trail is usually pretty easy to follow, but it might be good to load the gpx file (contact us to request the file) especially if any snow has fallen.  Also, you must be aware that you have to stop at 3.6 miles and turn around. There is a boundary here for the Owens Headwaters Wilderness Area and bikes are strictly prohibited past this point. Last time we rode it, there was no visible “Wilderness Boundary Sign” so it’s on you to be responsible.  You MUST NOT RIDE YOUR BIKE IN THE WILDERNESS AREA.  We recommend using an app on your phone or carry a GPS device so that you can track your mileage. Feel free to park the bike and continue hiking past this point.  By foot, you can get to Yost Lake and Fern Lake – both great spots to eat some grub and relax.  Anyhoo, once you turn around, it’s pretty much rip-roaring downhill fun all the way back to the car.  There are hikers once in a while, so be wary – and remember to stay in control in the exposed areas and steep switchbacks.  Now go ride!

Note: The best part of the trail (arguably) is the 2.2 miles from the parking area to the ski area – so that’s a good turnaround point as well, if you want to cut the ride a little short or don’t want to mess with getting near the Wilderness Boundary

  • Ride Type:  Out and Back
  • Difficulty:  Advanced climbing and descending skills required.  This is a lung-buster climb with exposed descents.
  • Time of Year:  Summer and Fall (possibly early Winter/ late Spring depending on snowfall)
  • Terrain/Conditions: Singletrack, with some loose/sandy sections
  • Access: From Mammoth, take Highway 395 north for 20 miles to the southern turnoff for the June Lake Loop (Hwy 158).  Drive for about 2 miles.  You’ll reach the Fire Station and the Balancing Boulder on the right side of the road.  The dirt parking lot is on the left, directly across from the fire station.  You’ll see the trail sign. 
  • Length: 7.2 miles total (3.6 to the Owens Headwaters Wilderness Boundary)
  • Approx. Time: 1.5 – 3 hours, depending on skills and comfort level
  • Lowest Elevation: 7,718′
  • Highest Elevation: 9,250′
  • Total Elevation Gain: 1,678′ (with around 1,500′ coming in the first 3.6 miles – ouch!)
  • Bike Recommendation: Lightweight XC mountain bike is best. Full suspension or hardtail.  If riding after snow has fallen, a fat bike might be best 🙂
  • GPX File: Available by contacting us
  • More Info:  Check out the Mountain Biking Mammoth Book

Turn by Turn (in miles):

0.0 – Start heading up from the trailhead sign (see photo).  You’ll quickly pass by a large kiosk with a map.  The trail is wide at first, but narrows soon.  The climbing is relentless.
.75 – The climbing starts to ease up, but is still tough.  You leave the exposed mountainside and head inward a bit.  The riding gets a little easier, but the views are diminished.
2.2 – Reach the Ski Area.  Here you merge with a wide ski run and descend for a short bit.  Look to your left and find the singletrack.  Jump on this and start climbing again.  This area of the trail is sometimes faint, but more recently has been defined well by rocks, etc.
2.9 – Cross a small creek
3.6 – Reach the Wilderness Boundary.  Turn around here and retrace your ride back to the car.  Enjoy the sweet trip back – you earned these turns!!

Map of Yost Meadows Trail to the Wilderness Boundary

Map of Yost Meadows Trail to the Wilderness Boundary

Elevation Profile for the climb

Elevation Profile for the climb

Gorgeous view of Gull Lake as you're climbing the mountainside

Gorgeous view of Gull Lake as you’re climbing the mountainside

Stop for a breather.  Sweet view of June Lake

Stop for a breather. Sweet view of June Lake

Sweet section going through an aspen grove

Sweet section going through an aspen grove

Junction with the Ski Trail

Junction with the Ski Trail

Pretty meadow near Yost Lake - You can only hike here, it's past the Wilderness Boundary

Pretty meadow near Yost Lake – You can only hike here, it’s past the Wilderness Boundary

This map from the Mountain Biking Mammoth Book (which was approved by the USFS) shows the Wilderness Boundary very clearly

This map from the Mountain Biking Mammoth Book (which was approved by the USFS) shows the Wilderness Boundary very clearly

 


Ride Report: Uptown / Downtown – Public (Short) Loop – No Bike Park

One of the staples for Mammoth locals and visitors alike.  At some point, everyone rides “Uptown – Downtown”.  It can either be a great introduction to mountain biking, or an all out lung-buster if you really push it.  The version described here is for the “short” loop which goes up to the Earthquake Fault Junction and does not include the portion that enters the Mammoth Mountain Bike Park.  You CAN do this ride without purchasing a bike park ticket.  If you have a bike park pass/ticket, and you’re looking for a longer loop, consider the Uptown/Downtown Full Loop on the Mammoth Mountain Bike Park Map.  Another option is to cross Highway 203 at the Earthquake Fault Junction and continue climbing up Mountain View Trail (a great out and back that is also free to the public without need for a bike park ticket), and then connect back with Downtown.  If you’re having trouble figuring out what to ride, or the best way to connect these trails into a ride that suits your style/ability, contact us – and we’ll help you construct a ride that’s right for you!!

WINTER SNOW RIDING:

We started “fatpacking” this loop on snowshoes for winter snowriding.  When it’s packed, this is the best singletrack snow riding in Mammoth.  If you’re in Mammoth during Winter months and are looking to ride this on your fat bike, contact us first to see if it’s been packed and get an update on current trail conditions.

  • Ride Type: Loop
  • Difficulty: Minimally Technical, Moderate Climbing, Fast Descending
  • Time of Year: Summer and Fall for mountain biking, Winter and Spring when we snowshoe pack it for fat bike use.
  • Terrain/Conditions: Mostly singletrack, although Downtown is wider with doubletrack in sections and tends to get sandy in parts with brake bumps in the turns.
  • Access: Go up Main St through Mammoth Lakes.  Make a right turn on Minaret Rd/ Highway 203.  The Village will be on your left, and The Village Parking Lot will be on your right.  Park here.  Ride up to the intersection of Minaret and Forest Trail.  The trailhead is well signed and just ahead on your left.
  • Length: 3.8 miles
  • Approx. Time: 30 min – 1 hours
  • Lowest Elevation: 8,052′
  • Highest Elevation: 8,531′
  • Total Elevation Gain: 498′
  • Bike Recommendation: XC Mountain Bike, Fat Bike, pretty much any bike will do.  Be prepared to pedal!
  • GPX File: Available by contacting us

Turn by Turn (in miles):

0.0 – start climbing the Uptown Trail (the one on the right).  Get into a good rhythm, as you’ll be climbing for a while.

1.9 – reach the Earthquake Fault Junction.  Go left here to get on Downtown and start descending back to The Village.  If you’re connecting with Mountain View Trail, go right and cross Highway 203 to the Mountain View Trailhead.  If you continue going up here, you’ll be in the Mammoth Mountain Bike Park where a ticket/pass is necessary.

3.8 – reach the end of the loop where you started.

Uptown- Downtown Map

Uptown- Downtown Map

Uptown Trailhead in Summer

Uptown Trailhead in Summer

The Earthquake Fault Trail Junction.  This is the turnaround point.  Going past that barricade takes you into the Mammoth Mountain Bike Park

The Earthquake Fault Trail Junction. This is the turnaround point. Going past that barricade takes you into the Mammoth Mountain Bike Park

A fun section on the Downtown Trail

A fun section on the Downtown Trail

Uptown Trailhead in Winter

Uptown Trailhead in Winter

Uptown on the Fat Bike in Winter

Uptown on the Fat Bike in Winter

"2014 Person of the Year" and dear friend Kathy, getting fat!!Taking a break to do some trail cleanup by the Scenic Loop turnoff. Angela wins the "First Time Fattie Best Smile Award"!


Fatpacking the Uptown Trail – Singletrack Snow Riding in Mammoth

Dirty Teeth – Alan's Mountain Biking Adventures

Riding Uptown on snow.  There's a first time for everything. Riding Uptown on snow. There’s a first time for everything.

Have you ever ridden singletrack snow?  It’s pretty frickin fun.  As mountain bikers, we love the sight of endless ribbons of brown, tacky dirt singletrack (or sometimes white dirt, if you’re riding White Mesa).  But guess what?  A packed trail of snow, albeit different, can be equally sublime to ride – and just as visually stunning.  On either side of you is deep, fluffy snow, and you squiggle your bike through it all.  The best of all, is if you fall (actually WHEN you fall – it’s inevitable) – you poof into freshies.  What an adventure!  It truly brings the vibe of mountain biking to fat biking.

Yes.  It is as fun as it looks. Yes. It is as fun as it looks.

A few of us learned these joys first hand at the Fat Bike Summit last month.  We embarked on a group ride up at…

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