"Not all those who wander are lost." – J.R.R. Tolkien

Posts tagged “california

Ride Report: Lake Canyon Trail – Lundy Lake, CA

This is an ass kicker.  No doubt about it.  Don’t let the first 1/4 mile of pleasant singletrack fool you.  Your legs better be warm, as you climb over 1,600′ in only 3 miles.  This is an old 1880’s gold mining road that leads up to May Lundy Mine and Oneida Lake.  Much of it has deteriorated to singletrack, and it will get better if more people ride it.  In addition to the steep grade, the terrain is rocky and loose in many areas, making the climbing very tough.  Of course, the views are impeccable.  Right off the bat, you get great views of Lundy Lake and the campground.  Eventually you make your way into the glacial valley, paralleling Lake Canyon Creek and eventually crossing over it.  Shortly after, you reach Blue Lake and Crystal Lake on your left.  We strongly suggest you park your bike at the May Lundy Mine informational kiosk (3 miles) just before the Hoover Wilderness Boundary, and continue hiking to the mine, and Oneida Lake if you like.  Reminder – no bicycles allowed past the Wilderness Boundary!  There are lots of old mining relics around, and a nice views in all directions.  The ride down is a fast, fun, brake burning descent back to your car!

  • Ride Type:  Out and Back
  • Aerobic Difficulty: Short, steep climb is tough on the lungs
  • Technical Difficulty: Moderately technical (some rocks and shale)
  • Time of Year: Summer and Fall (sometimes late spring – depending on snow pack)
  • Terrain/Conditions: A mix of singletrack and doubletrack – some shale/rock gardens – gorgeous high alpine scenery and a historic abandoned mine.
  • Access: From the junction of Highway 395  and the 203 at Mammoth Lakes, drive north on the 395 for 32 miles.  Exit left towards Lundy Lake.  Drive for 3.5 miles and veer left on Lundy Dam Rd.  Park at the dam.  The ride starts at the gate.
  • Length: 6 miles
  • Approx. Time: 1.5 – 2.5 hours
  • Lowest Elevation: 7,808′
  • Highest Elevation: 9,494′
  • Total Elevation Gain: 1,665′
  • Bike Recommendation:  This can be ridden with pretty much any off-road bike, but a lightweight/ full suspension xc bike is ideal.
  • GPX File: Available by contacting us

Turn by Turn (in miles):

0.0 – Go past the gate and ride up to the informational kiosk.  After reading, head left on the singletrack.  Get ready to climb!
2.0 – Cross the creek, and enjoy a short section of flat riding.  This is a great spot to take a break.
3.0  – Reach the May Lundy Mine informational sign.  Although the actual Wilderness Boundary is 0.2 miles past here, this is where we park our bikes and hike up to the mine.  Walk ahead, and veer right in 0.1 mile and start climbing (going straight will take you to a dead end and an arsenic warning sign).  Once you reach the main mine shaft, you can continue hiking up to Oneida Lake as well.  Eventually, make your way back to your bike and start the descent.
6.0 – Reach the dam gate, end of ride.

Lake Canyon Trail - Map

Lake Canyon Trail – Map

Lake Canyon Trail - Elevation Profile (climb only)

Lake Canyon Trail – Elevation Profile (climb only)

Start of the ride at the gate by the dam.

Start of the ride at the gate by the dam.

View of Lundy Lake looking towards the campground

View of Lundy Lake looking towards the campground

Looking down towards the Lundy Lake dam

Looking down towards the Lundy Lake dam

A rare break in the climbing and a wicked view of Mt. Olsen

A rare break in the climbing and a wicked view of Mt. Olsen

Almost to the top of the ride.  Just after this meadow is the 3 mile mark.

Almost to the top of the ride. Just after this meadow is the 3 mile mark.

Here's the May Lundy Mine informational sign at the 3 mile mark.

Here’s the May Lundy Mine informational sign at the 3 mile mark.

Speaks for itself

Speaks for itself

Just in case you forget to park your bike at the May Lundy sign, don't take your bike past this sign at 3.2 miles!!

Just in case you forget to park your bike at the May Lundy sign, don’t take your bike past this sign at 3.2 miles!!

The mine opening has been covered up and debris is all around.

The mine opening has been covered up and debris is all around.

Old mining car tracks leading out of the defunct May Lundy Mine.

Old mining car tracks leading out of the defunct May Lundy Mine.


Ride Report: Silver Canyon Ride – Bishop, CA

The Silver Canyon Ride has an average 13.7% grade, and is one of the most brutal climbs in the area.  It’s on par with the Laurel Lakes Ride in terms of climbing treachery.  It’s also the first/toughest part of the White Mountain EpicAfter parking at the Laws Museum, engaging in nervous small talk, and applying ample chamois cream, you saddle up.  A peaceful climb eases the nerves and warms the legs.  You are cruising up the famous Silver Canyon Rd.  After not too long, that elementary climb turns into a grueling effort that has your lungs puffing out of your chest like Lou Ferrigno.  From 4,000′ to 10,800′ over 11.6 miles we go.  Silver Canyon is a grueling rite of passage climb.  Make sure your brake pads are fresh and your wits are perky.  The Silver Canyon descent is FAST and DANGEROUS.  Especially when you’re fatigued.  When it was raced in 1986 as the Plumline Ultimate Kamikaze,  they put nets and barricades up around the dangerous turns to keep people from flying off the mountain.  There were also ambulances at the ready, and yes, they were necessary.   There will be no ambulances, no barricades, nothing.  So BE WARNED.  Read Alan’s blog on Silver Canyon for a personal account of riding this trail, and the White Mountain Peak Challenge blog which has a ton of info and photos of Silver Canyon as well.

Note:  Much of this ride is very remote.  Please be self-sufficient and carry plenty of water and nutrition as well as items to fix your bike in a jam.  Weather frequently changes as well, so be ready for anything!!

  • Ride Type:  Out and Back – as described here
  • Difficulty:  Advanced climbing and descending skills required.  Have fresh brake pads for the descent!
  • Time of Year:  Summer and Fall
  • Terrain/Conditions: Mostly doubletrack/ jeep road with numerous creek crossings
  • Access: Park at the Laws Railroad Museum on Silver Canyon Rd. (off Hwy 6 out of Bishop).  The ride starts here.  Just head east on Silver Canyon Rd
  • Length: 22.6 miles total (11.3 miles each way)
  • Approx. Time: 3-5 hours, maybe more depending on skills and comfort level
  • Lowest Elevation: 4,114′
  • Highest Elevation: 10,504′
  • Total Elevation Gain: 6,483′
  • Bike Recommendation: Lightweight XC mountain bike is best. Full suspension or hardtail.
  • GPX File: Available by contacting us

Turn By Turn (in miles):

No turn by turn directions necessary here.  Simply climb up Silver Canyon Road.  Stay on the main road and don’t take any spur trails that might pop up.  You’ll do about 8 creek crossings and pass a gate around 8 miles in.   Then it gets really steep with a bunch of switchbacks.  Keep trucking until you reach White Mountain Road at 11.3 miles.  Turn around and head back to your car at Laws.  Pat self on back.

Silver Canyon Map

Silver Canyon Map

Silver Canyon Elevation Profile

Silver Canyon Elevation Profile

Looking down from the steep switchback after the gate

Looking down from the steep switchback after the gate

One of the steep climbs you have to look forward to.

One of the steep climbs you have to look forward to.

Silver Canyon Road with the Eastern Sierras in the background

Silver Canyon Road with the Eastern Sierras in the background

Junction of Silver Canyon Road and White Mountain Road

Junction of Silver Canyon Road and White Mountain Road


Ride Report: Uptown / Downtown – Public (Short) Loop – No Bike Park

One of the staples for Mammoth locals and visitors alike.  At some point, everyone rides “Uptown – Downtown”.  It can either be a great introduction to mountain biking, or an all out lung-buster if you really push it.  The version described here is for the “short” loop which goes up to the Earthquake Fault Junction and does not include the portion that enters the Mammoth Mountain Bike Park.  You CAN do this ride without purchasing a bike park ticket.  If you have a bike park pass/ticket, and you’re looking for a longer loop, consider the Uptown/Downtown Full Loop on the Mammoth Mountain Bike Park Map.  Another option is to cross Highway 203 at the Earthquake Fault Junction and continue climbing up Mountain View Trail (a great out and back that is also free to the public without need for a bike park ticket), and then connect back with Downtown.  If you’re having trouble figuring out what to ride, or the best way to connect these trails into a ride that suits your style/ability, contact us – and we’ll help you construct a ride that’s right for you!!

WINTER SNOW RIDING:

We started “fatpacking” this loop on snowshoes for winter snowriding.  When it’s packed, this is the best singletrack snow riding in Mammoth.  If you’re in Mammoth during Winter months and are looking to ride this on your fat bike, contact us first to see if it’s been packed and get an update on current trail conditions.

  • Ride Type: Loop
  • Difficulty: Minimally Technical, Moderate Climbing, Fast Descending
  • Time of Year: Summer and Fall for mountain biking, Winter and Spring when we snowshoe pack it for fat bike use.
  • Terrain/Conditions: Mostly singletrack, although Downtown is wider with doubletrack in sections and tends to get sandy in parts with brake bumps in the turns.
  • Access: Go up Main St through Mammoth Lakes.  Make a right turn on Minaret Rd/ Highway 203.  The Village will be on your left, and The Village Parking Lot will be on your right.  Park here.  Ride up to the intersection of Minaret and Forest Trail.  The trailhead is well signed and just ahead on your left.
  • Length: 3.8 miles
  • Approx. Time: 30 min – 1 hours
  • Lowest Elevation: 8,052′
  • Highest Elevation: 8,531′
  • Total Elevation Gain: 498′
  • Bike Recommendation: XC Mountain Bike, Fat Bike, pretty much any bike will do.  Be prepared to pedal!
  • GPX File: Available by contacting us

Turn by Turn (in miles):

0.0 – start climbing the Uptown Trail (the one on the right).  Get into a good rhythm, as you’ll be climbing for a while.

1.9 – reach the Earthquake Fault Junction.  Go left here to get on Downtown and start descending back to The Village.  If you’re connecting with Mountain View Trail, go right and cross Highway 203 to the Mountain View Trailhead.  If you continue going up here, you’ll be in the Mammoth Mountain Bike Park where a ticket/pass is necessary.

3.8 – reach the end of the loop where you started.

Uptown- Downtown Map

Uptown- Downtown Map

Uptown Trailhead in Summer

Uptown Trailhead in Summer

The Earthquake Fault Trail Junction.  This is the turnaround point.  Going past that barricade takes you into the Mammoth Mountain Bike Park

The Earthquake Fault Trail Junction. This is the turnaround point. Going past that barricade takes you into the Mammoth Mountain Bike Park

A fun section on the Downtown Trail

A fun section on the Downtown Trail

Uptown Trailhead in Winter

Uptown Trailhead in Winter

Uptown on the Fat Bike in Winter

Uptown on the Fat Bike in Winter

"2014 Person of the Year" and dear friend Kathy, getting fat!!Taking a break to do some trail cleanup by the Scenic Loop turnoff. Angela wins the "First Time Fattie Best Smile Award"!